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#FirstDraft60 2016: Day 1—Determining Your Commitment and Motivation with Guided Questions

Sunday, October 2, 2016

#FirstDraft60 | KayeDacus.comWelcome to the official first day of #FirstDraft60–2016, a sixty-day challenge to plan and write a manuscript first draft. I hope you spent some time yesterday ruminating on the questions posed and reviewing the planned schedule for the challenge. Today, the questions dig a lot deeper into why and how we’re going to do this challenge. I’ll post my answers in the comments—because I needed to do this exercise, and hopefully to serve as encouragement for you to share your answers as well.

A note for those who are planning to participate but are writing nonfiction—the posts and advice will be focused on fiction writing, but you should be able to apply much of it to writing nonfiction as well. If you aren’t sure about any of it and how it might apply to nonfiction, please post your question(s) in the comments for clarification.

As promised yesterday, here’s the calendar for this week so you can start planning ahead:

#FirstDraft60 2016: Day 1—Determining Your Commitment and Motivation with Guided Questions | KayeDacus.com

Determining Your Commitment and Motivation with Guided Questions
Today, it’s time to not just think about but also actually answer some questions that will hopefully kick-start your planning and preparation for this project. (Adapted from Book in a Month by Victoria Lynn Schmidt.) You can answer them here in the comments, or if you want to blog through this yourself, please share the link to your post with your answers to these questions:

    1. Why do you want to write?

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?

    3. If this is your first attempt at completing a manuscript, how do you think finishing it will impact your life?
    OR, If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?


Considerations to Get You Through This Challenge

(Again, adapted from Book in a Month by Victoria Lynn Schmidt.)

  • Set a specific time every day to write.
    The book suggests doing it first thing in the morning before you get distracted and pulled in different directions. Mornings may not work for you, though. So choose a time that you can consistently set aside every day and make an appointment with yourself—set a reminder on your phone or computer if you need to, block out the time on your calendar. This is a commitment you are making to yourself. Your owe it to yourself to make it important. Start practicing this month by doing our FirstDraft60 preparation activities during your appointed writing time. If you make setting that time aside a habit now, it will be that much easier.
  • Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    October and November may be hard months to do this for those of us who are TV addicts, since most of our favorite shows are premiering new seasons and all of the new fall shows will be debuting (not to mention football games and other outdoor activities we might go to/participate in). But completing this first draft takes priority. If you don’t have a DVR or Hulu, plan to have your prep work (October) or word count (November) complete before the show comes on; otherwise, save them for later as rewards for when you meet your goals. Also—your writing time should be phone-free and Internet-free. No distractions.
  • Track your progress.
    We’ll get into this more in a future post, but consider tracking writing-related activities besides just word count. Outlining, making revision notes, brainstorming, character casting—this month, you’ll be doing a lot that’s writing related but not actually building word count. It’s all time spent on your story, so why not track it to see just how much you’re really accomplishing.
  • Meals.
    Consider planning and precooking (or at least pre-preparing) meals for the upcoming week on the weekends when you have more time. Here’s a YouTube Vlogger who has videos with ideas for how to plan ahead of time to make the most of your limited time during the week.
  • Prioritize.
    The writing portion of this challenge is only 30 days. What can you give up or put on hold for 30 days in order to achieve the goal of a completed first draft?
  • Say no.
    For the 30 days of this challenge in which you’ll be writing, don’t take on any new responsibilities or obligations that aren’t absolutely required. You have, right now, 30 days’ warning in which to prepare yourself for this. Start practicing now. Is it a matter of life or death? Does it put your job at risk to say no? Or are you just risking someone else getting miffed at you? You’ve already made a commitment to this challenge. Isn’t your commitment to yourself and your writing just as important—if not more so—than anything else that might come up? Practice telling people that you have a commitment right now, but as soon as you’re finished, you’d be more than happy to help them out.
    List of Considerations… (to copy/paste into your comment)

    • Set a specific time every day to write.
    • Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    • Track your progress.
    • Meals.
    • Prioritize.
    • Say no.


Your Questions, Suggestions, and Ideas

Once you answer the Guided Questions and address the Considerations above, don’t forget to also post your own questions, suggestions, and ideas to help encourage and support each other.

24 Comments leave one →
  1. Sunday, October 2, 2016 12:02 am

    Guided Questions:
    1. Why do you want to write?

    Writing has been such a major part of who I am for more than 30 years—and since I haven’t been writing for the past several years, I’ve been struggling with depression based on knowing that there’s part of myself that I’m denying existence because of the bad memories associated with it after burning out on being a “professional/full-time” writer. I want to write because I want to fall in love with writing again.

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?
    Finishing this project in sixty days will mean that I’ve conquered the monster that’s kept me from being able to enjoy writing for the last four or five years. I hope that completing this challenge will change me back into someone who enjoys writing by reminding me that even though it is “work,” it’s also something that I used to love doing, whether I had to work at it or not.

    3. If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?
    Although I’m trying not to look at this as I did the last book contract I signed—which was: I need a contract in order to make money to live on—I am tired of having to work two jobs (my full-time day job and a part-time freelance job) in order to have extra money for things like, say, getting my cracked windshield replaced or getting some long-term bills paid off finally or, perhaps, having a social life. I’m hoping that by falling in love with writing again, I can get my new work out there and make the extra money I need by doing something I love instead of something that’s just “a job.”

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?
    This goes back to what I wrote about yesterday (and before that)—I’ve allowed my social circle to narrow so much (I work from home in both of my jobs and don’t really have the wherewithal to afford to get out and do much) that the problem is not that I have people who won’t support me, it’s that I don’t have enough people period. Again, building my support team (and social circle) is a side challenge for me over the next sixty days.

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?
    I vaguely remember what it feels like to complete a manuscript—even just a rough draft. I’m planning to spend a few minutes every day “meditating” on that feeling as a way to motivate myself to recapture it.

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?
    Discipline. And, as part of discipline, accountability. Last year when I did this, I didn’t really get much accomplished. I blamed it on the manuscript—it wasn’t the right story at the right time. The characters weren’t right. But, frankly, the fault lay solely with me and not being disciplined. I could have churned out a draft if I’d stuck to it. I might not have liked it, but I could have done it. I’ve done it before. This year, I must employ self-discipline (and, again, find a support/accountability team) and make myself complete this manuscript.

    Like

  2. Sunday, October 2, 2016 12:02 am

    Considerations:
    Set a specific time every day to write.
    In discussing what I could do in order to help myself recapture my former joy in writing, I realized that something I used to do that I stopped many years ago is that I used to take my laptop into the bedroom with me at night and write for at least an hour before going to sleep (we’re talking pre-WiFi days here—so there were few temptations on the laptop). It helped me block out everything else that happened during the day (or might be on the schedule for the next day) as I sat there with just one dim lamp and the computer—and everything else blanketed in darkness and, thus, gone. So while I’m going to make sure that I spend at least an hour in the afternoons/evenings working on “story stuff,” if not writing, I will commit to writing in bed for at least an hour every night once we start the writing part of the challenge on November 1.

    Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    As a TV addict, for me October and November are hard months to make a time commitment to something, since all of the shows are back with new episodes. But completing this first draft takes priority. I have Hulu, so I already don’t watch most of my shows the day they air, except for one or two on CBS (looking at you, Criminal Minds!). So other than that one hour on Wednesday nights, I plan to save my shows as weekly rewards for meeting my goals. I will also be silencing my phone and turning the WiFi off on my laptop when it’s time to write.

    Track your progress.
    One of the things I have to do in my job is track the exact amount of time I spend on each project I’m assigned, both daily and weekly. Because of this, I’ve started thinking more in terms of tracking time rather than just crossing things off of a to-do list. So I’m going to do for my writing time the same thing I do for work—print a week-at-a-glance calendar at the beginning of each week and mark the start and end time of any writing-related task I do each day. I might even adapt the spreadsheet we use for work in order to have an overview at the end of this 60 days of not just how many words I wrote, but also how many hours I spent working. After all, being successful as a writer can’t just be measured by word count. But I will track that, too.

    Meals.
    Years ago when I was not only writing full-time but also being pretty successful at losing weight on Weight Watchers, I spent some time every Sunday afternoon making a meal plan for the upcoming week as well as cooking/preparing ahead whatever I could (while also doing laundry and other tasks around the house). I intend to do that again now. Because not only do I have a tendency to overspend my food budget when I don’t plan ahead, but I also tend to waste a lot more time either going out to get something to eat or trying to figure out what to fix. And the first step I need to take in this part of the plan is to clean my kitchen—it’s a disaster area. And I hate cooking in a messy kitchen!

    Prioritize.
    This is where I tend to fail—I pay lip-service and say that I’m making my writing a priority, but I’m at my core a very lazy person, so it’s so much easier to procrastinate than it is to make myself write. So each day, I need to remind myself why this needs to be a priority and why I need to choose to write before I commit to doing anything (or nothing) else.

    Say no.
    Again, because of my self-imposed isolation, this shouldn’t be a problem in the beginning—but if I follow through on the challenge of getting “out there” more and expanding my social support system, I’ll need to remember that writing is my priority right now and I might not be able to do everything I want to.

    Like

  3. Carol permalink
    Sunday, October 2, 2016 9:14 am

    1. Why do you want to write?
    This is cliche, but true: I can’t not write. I’ve tried to stop writing. Can’t do it.

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?
    Finishing this project will give me a sense of completion (sounds vague and stupid-right?). But much of my writing the past couple of years has been gangbusters out of the gate only to fizzle out halfway through. Time to end that pattern. I think completing this challenge will give me a boost of confidence where my writing is concerned. And, I need that-a lot of that.

    3. If this is your first attempt at completing a manuscript, how do you think finishing it will impact your life?
    OR, If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?
    Not my first manuscript, but will be the first one written by following a plan. Also hope it’s my first one that I follow all the way through to making it submission ready.

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?
    That’s not a problem for me-thankfully. My husband is uber-supportive. But, like Kaye, I have a severely limited social circle. Mostly because I’m quite introverted, but also because I am away from home 12+ hours a day Monday through Friday, and by the time I get home I’m cooked. The PJs go on and that’s the end. I do feel the lack of close female friends. Something I need to work on.

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?
    That confidence boost I mentioned in #2 motivates me. My self confidence has taken a couple of seriously huge hits over the past two and a half years (no I’m not giving details). I’m getting myself back, but definitely need to finish refilling my tank. Meeting this goal will go a long way toward that-toward believing in myself again.

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?
    Perseverance, or something called BICHOKTAM (butt in chair, hands on keyboard, typing away madly)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sunday, October 2, 2016 3:20 pm

      I used to be like that, Carol—that I though I’d never be able to stop writing. That’s one of the reasons I need to do this challenge: so I can get back to being that kind of person!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Carol permalink
    Sunday, October 2, 2016 9:21 am

    Set a specific time every day to write.
    I ride the commuter train to and from work five days per week-no excuses to do anything but write during that time.

    Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    Have a DVR and Hulu subscription-I don’t have to watch live TV except for football. I refuse to give up football. But most of the time I can write or work on writing activities during football. Unless the Vols continue to play like they have been-Heart Attack Vols.

    Track your progress.
    Love Kaye’s idea of tracking all writing related activities. I tend to get down if I feel like I haven’t added to my word count. But a way to visualize those other things we have to do would help me realize I’m being productive even if I don’t add 2k to my word count widget.

    Meals.
    I already do a weekly menu most weeks just because I don’t have a lot of time. Most of the meals I prepare during the week require less than 30 minutes.

    Prioritize.
    Yep-getting better about that.

    Say no.
    I already do this a lot due to time constraints.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sunday, October 2, 2016 3:22 pm

      I don’t have cable TV, so football (at least LSU football) is pretty much off the table for me this year. I do have alerts on my phone, though, during gametime—for each scoring play. Of course, in addition to not spending four or five hours of a Saturday afternoon or evening watching the game, I also don’t have the additional stress that goes along with being an LSU football fan! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Sunday, October 2, 2016 12:18 pm

    1. Why do I want to write?
    I’ve been writing since in high school so it’s a natural extension of who I am.

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?
    I’ve won Nano 3 times – each a part of a proposed trilogy. This would be a stand-alone, something I should be able to edit into a publishable piece.

    3. If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?
    Again, this would be my first stand-alone, something that would be easier to publish.

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?
    The majority of the people who surround me daily don’t care/don’t understand/won’t encourage. I have to shake them off and find the others who do care/do understand/are also going through this insane time.

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?
    December is uber busy for me, with holiday baking. But I can use that motivation to write late into the night.

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?
    Accountability. When I belonged to a writers group, I submitted a chapter (or 2) to them each week for review. I don’t have that in my current location.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sunday, October 2, 2016 3:22 pm

      And besides December being super busy, you could look at completing a manuscript before that starts as a gift to yourself!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Sunday, October 2, 2016 12:34 pm

    Set a specific time every day to write.
    Because of my job, I’ve become a night owl, so most of my writing will happen between 10pm and 2am. I should be able to squeeze some in during my office hours, though.

    Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    I use my DVR a lot currently. I do support our college athletics at home, though. I’d be golden if I could find a pen that wrote in near zero temperatures in the hockey arena.

    Track your progress.
    I like numbers during Nano so I’m using Pacemaker: A Word Count Program this year.

    Meals.
    My compensation package includes the cafeteria so that’s taken care of. I only need to stock up on caffeine and sugar.

    Prioritize.
    I have lots to do in the evening so I’ll add writing to the list of things I must get done daily.

    Say no.
    This is a hard one, but I’ll keep working on it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sunday, October 2, 2016 3:24 pm

      10 p.m. to 2 a.m. is my JAM! Fortunately, I work from home and my bosses are on the Pacific time zone (I’m in Central), so I can stay up late like that and still get a good 7-8 hours of sleep before I have to be “at” work.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Sunday, October 2, 2016 3:18 pm

    I’ve blogged the questions with answers https://literarilyillumined.wordpress.com/2016/10/02/follow-along-fiction-firstdraft60-2016-day-1-nanowrimoprep/

    Thank you again Kaye!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Shirley permalink
    Sunday, October 2, 2016 11:45 pm

    Guided Questions:

    1. Why do you want to write?
    I used to write all the time, it used to just flow easily and I loved the joy it gave me. Then life happened and it stopped being part of my daily life and then some overwhelming realities happened that severely crushed my imagination for a long time (whenever I attempted to write it was hard work all the time rather than the flowing I remembered) and when I struck a balance of flow and hard work in my writing life took over again and writing took a serious backseat again. Basically, I miss it and it’s always been my dream career to be a writer.

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?
    It would mean either getting further than I’ve ever gotten with a writing project (usually stall a few chapters in) or actually completing one for the first time! Yes, I do think it would change me, it would imbue me with confidence to push forward with my writing and also remove some of my deep inner (and very irrational) fear of succeeding.

    3. If this is your first attempt at completing a manuscript, how do you think finishing it will impact your life?
    OR, If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?
    Well, if I finish (or at least get close to finishing and continue on another few weeks to actually do so), I hope it will be the start of a career in writing romance and will not only be an improvement financially but bring added happiness to my life.

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?
    While my husband and preteen daughter don’t fall into this category I have extended family that would likely frown on my writing romance and while their lack of support might hurt initially it’s not something that will stop me.

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?
    I can only imagine how excited and satisfied I will feel but I plan to remind myself that having a finished rough draft puts me one step closer to my dream job.

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?
    Alone time so I can focus and have zero distractions around me.

    Like

    • Monday, October 3, 2016 1:47 pm

      Shirley, I know the struggles all-too-well to have people who didn’t even blink when I became a published, full-time author . . . but who couldn’t let the chance to be somewhat denigrating about my writing romance (even clean/Christian romance!) because they didn’t take it seriously. And the question I always had for them whenever they asked “why romance” was “I’d rather write something I love and that makes me happy than to have any other job.” So stick to your resolve and your passion!

      Like

  9. Shirley permalink
    Sunday, October 2, 2016 11:58 pm

    Considerations:

    1. Set a specific time every day to write.
    In the morning after my preteen heads off to her bus stop and my toddler is still asleep – 7:30am-10am on a good morning, 7:30am-11am on a great morning

    2. Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    I will be cutting down on my reading – will use it as a reward for when I’ve met/exceeded my daily writing goal. Also, shows can wait if necessary as we have a PVR unit but can also be a reward if I have to make up my word count goal later in the day.

    3. Track your progress.
    I will be keeping track via the Word Count feature and in my writing notebook.

    4. Meals.
    I don’t feel that meals should interfere with my writing unless I didn’t quite make my word count goal and have to make it up later…in which case I will make a frozen pizza or get a slow cooker meal started early.

    5. Prioritize.
    I’m a procrastinator so I may have to hand write my daily word goal and transfer it after the fact in order to avoid my usual time wasters like Facebook, etc…but I want this so badly that I can taste it so I’m hoping that will help.

    6. Say no.
    I don’t have anything taking up my time in November, I do have Thanksgiving next weekend (I’m Canadian) in which I have to cook something for a family get together but November’s wide open and will stay that way as I’ve become the queen of saying ‘no’ due to some people in my life. lol

    Like

    • Monday, October 3, 2016 1:49 pm

      Yes, Canadians get the better end of this schedule, since your Thanksgiving falls during the Prep month instead of during the Writing month. But saying no is always hard no matter what time of year it is!

      Like

  10. Tuesday, October 4, 2016 7:24 pm

    Guided Questions:

    1. Why do you want to write?

    I’m a writer, and always have been. Since having my twins, a regular routine has been harder to nail down. I do well for a few weeks, and then my productivity falls off. This is a good way of pushing myself to be consistent, with the added bonus that I’ll get a third manuscript for my effort!

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?

    Finishing my first book taught me that I can stick with something to completion. Editing and polishing it taught me that I’m willing to hack my darlings to death if it makes the story stronger. Completing a draft in sixty days? That might make me feel like Wonder Woman. I will feel more capable and more confident that I can make things happen and get things done.

    3. If this is your first attempt at completing a manuscript, how do you think finishing it will impact your life? OR, If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?

    The thing I’m most excited about is starting from scratch with new characters, a new setting, and a new set of challenges to work through. My second book is a sequel to the first, so I’ve only written full-length manuscripts about one set of characters. Starting fresh already feels invigorating.

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?

    I’m really lucky that I have so much support from the people around me. The only ones who won’t be encouraging are my 19-month-olds. They like having me around, and I may have to disappear sometimes. Normally I work from home as an admissions consultant anyway, so at least they’re used to me being busy. My job slows down for these couple of months, so it’s the perfect time for me to take on something else. And hopefully the little ones won’t feel like much has changed.

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?

    I made a deal with myself to try to build a writing career in the four years I have until my kids start school. Completing this challenge will prove that I’m serious and give me more momentum to keep pushing toward that goal.

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?

    Discipline. I have to make myself keep writing when I’d rather do something else and especially when the perfectionist in me knows my first draft is terrible. Sloppy writing can be hard for me to accept, but I have to remember that the sloppier a draft is, the more fun it is to write, because it’s pure creating vs editing.

    Like

  11. Tuesday, October 4, 2016 7:46 pm

    List of Considerations:
    1. Set a specific time every day to write.
    I’m working on becoming a morning person (following The Morning Miracle for Writers plan). If my youngsters sleep late enough, I’ll write one hour in the morning. If they don’t, I’ll write during their nap, which should buy me a good two hours each afternoon.

    2. Commit to cutting out frivolous/non-productive activities.
    If I keep the TV off during nap time, I’ll be most of the way there. If I turn it on, I’m in trouble, so I’ll plan to keep it off, no matter how good a chance to let my brain melt might feel. I’m committing to not hopping on the internet during writing time, either. Offline work only.

    3. Track your progress.
    I use the Pomodoro technique when writing and it’s a nice way of racing the clock every twenty-five minutes to see how much I can get done. I’ll track my words that way.

    4. Meals.
    Oh, yeesh, I am the worst cook anyway. Learning to master even the very basics of cooking, meal prep and nutrition is on my list of goals for the next twelve months. For this two-month period, I’ll just have to wing it. Everything I make is simple, so it never takes a ton of time.

    5. Prioritize.
    I work from home, so my schedule is flexible. I’ll mostly have to prioritize actually writing vs. all the other writing-related activities I could do instead (like messing with my website, blogging, and reading up on publishing stuff).

    6. Say no.
    My social circle is tiny since I relocated recently and haven’t made many friends yet. Saying no shouldn’t be a problem. (And Kaye, if you’re reading this, I work from home as well and completely relate to your comments about feeling socially isolated. I adore the independence my job provides, but the lack of face-to-face interaction takes a toll after a while. I’m sure you’ve thought of all the tips I could offer, and I don’t have many anyway, but I just wanted to say I get where you’re coming from!)

    Like

  12. Monday, October 17, 2016 10:23 pm

    1. Why do you want to write?
    I’m a very analytical person by nature and profession, but I’ve always had a bit of a creative side in drawing and writing. With the encouragement of my best friend (and now, co-author), I have found writing to be fun and at the same time stretches my creativity.

    2. What will finishing this project in sixty days mean to you? Do you think that completing this challenge will change you? How?
    I think this will be a big accomplishment for me. My co-author tends to come up with the basic storyline for our writing, and I add in some details and write it. Coming up with the storyline all by myself is daunting, but exciting. I think this challenge will change me and prove to myself that I can come up with interesting ideas on my own.

    3. If this is your first attempt at completing a manuscript, how do you think finishing it will impact your life?
    OR, If you’ve completed multiple manuscripts, what will finishing another one mean to you?
    Until it is published, are our manuscripts ever finished? 🙂 I’ve only finished one short story. It was a great feeling, but I’ve learned so much since then. I’m excited to see how this next part turns out.

    4. What will happen if the people closest to you don’t understand, support, and encourage you during this challenge?
    I’m pretty good at setting boundaries for these kinds of things. It helps that my hubby works a later shift and I have the evening to work by myself.

    5. Imagine how you will feel on November 30 knowing that you’ve completed this challenge. How can you use that to motivate you during the next sixty days?
    Many of my friends and family have known my co-author and I have been working on writing for over 3 years and no “book” is done. So this will be something tangible to show something else has been completed.

    6. What is the ONE thing you think you’re going to need the most to help you accomplish your goal for this challenge?
    I have a difficult time coming up with plot points when it comes down to the details. I have a general idea of the story (maybe 15 bulletpoints for the whole story), but then I start to fumble without the help of my trusty co-author.

    Like

Trackbacks

  1. First Draft in Sixty Days | Carol Collett
  2. Follow Along Fiction #FirstDraft60 2016: Day 1 #NANOWRIMOprep  – Literarily Illumined
  3. #FirstDraft60 Day 9: Monday Motivation–Don’t Think. Just Write. #amwriting #nanoprep #nanowrimo | KayeDacus.com
  4. The Slow Road or Adjusting on the Fly to a More Realistic Goal | Carol Collett

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