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The Downside of Being a Writer, from R. A. Salvatore (@r_a_salvatore)

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Excerpt From Part 10 (“Understanding the Downside of Being a Novelist”) of The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists.

101 Habits

Remember when you were in the second grade and you wrote something you thought was the best thing ever written? Then it came back from the teacher covered in red marks, destroying you. That’s what being a writer is, every single day. Particularly with the Internet and the loudmouths it inspires, a writer will hear constantly how much he/she sucks. And the bigger you get, the worse it will be. So if you don’t believe in yourself, you’ll be another of those writers who walks around with his head down, thoroughly depressed. I know a lot of writers, but I know very, very few happy writers.

~R. A. Salvatore
(quoted from pg. 22)

About the book:
Learn from the MASTERS!

In The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists, more than fifty of the greatest fiction writers of our time show you how they practice their craft. You’ll gain insight into every aspect of fiction writing, including:

Coming up with ideas
Knowing what makes a great story
Developing dialogue
Overcoming writer’s block
Creating a pitch synopsis
Promoting yourself

The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists is a “who’s who” of today’s great fiction writers that will quickly become your most trusted writing companion!

__________________________________________
Work Cited:

Salvatore, R. A. Quoted in Chapter 2: “Commitment” in The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists. Andrew McAleer, ed. Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2008. 21–30. Print.

JoAnn Ross on the Passion for Writing (@JoAnnRoss)

Monday, April 21, 2014

Excerpt From Part 8 (“Being Passionate about the Craft”) of Chapter 1 “A Portrait of a Novelist” in The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists (ed. Andrew McAleer)

101 Habits

I firmly believe in the “three P” philosophy of writing: passion, patience, and persistence. I also believe that of the three, passion is the most important. It’s passion for storytelling that gives us our purpose, drives us to learn, and keeps us working, long after publication, to master our craft.

Passion is what keeps us writing through the difficult times (and all writers have them!). It’s the passion shining through in our stories that makes people we’ll probably never meet want to read them. It’s passion that pushes us to the edge, which is a place where we writers sometimes need to be. As Kurt Vonnegut said, “I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge, you see all kinds of things you can’t see from the center.”

Conversely, lack of passion will also show in your work. And most important, if you don’t have a burning passion for writing, how can you expect anyone else to be moved by what you write?

~JoAnn Ross
(quoted from pg. 17)

About the book:
Learn from the MASTERS!

In The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists, more than fifty of the greatest fiction writers of our time show you how they practice their craft. You’ll gain insight into every aspect of fiction writing, including:

Coming up with ideas
Knowing what makes a great story
Developing dialogue
Overcoming writer’s block
Creating a pitch synopsis
Promoting yourself

The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists is a “who’s who” of today’s great fiction writers that will quickly become your most trusted writing companion!

__________________________________________
Work Cited:

Ross, JoAnn. Quoted in “Being Passionate about the Craft” in The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists. Andrew McAleer, ed. Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2008. 3–20. Print.

Andrew McAleer on Being Passionate about the Craft of Writing

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Excerpt From Part 8 (“Being Passionate about the Craft”) of Chapter 1 “A Portrait of a Novelist” in The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists (ed. Andrew McAleer)

101 Habits

Writing is a craft and an art. If you are a writer, you are an artist as much as is an oil painter, sculptor, or ancient stone mason. Your passion for words and sentence structure should equal a painter’s passion for color and brushstroke. Take pride in knowing that what you are giving readers is your best work. Like a true artist, never be satisfied that your work cannot be improved.
~Andrew McAleer
(quoted from pp. 16–17)

About the book:
Learn from the MASTERS!

In The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists, more than fifty of the greatest fiction writers of our time show you how they practice their craft. You’ll gain insight into every aspect of fiction writing, including:

Coming up with ideas
Knowing what makes a great story
Developing dialogue
Overcoming writer’s block
Creating a pitch synopsis
Promoting yourself

The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists is a “who’s who” of today’s great fiction writers that will quickly become your most trusted writing companion!

__________________________________________
Work Cited:

McAleer, Andrew. “Being Passionate about the Craft” in The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists. Andrew McAleer, ed. Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2008. 3–20. Print.

Word Nerd Alert—Some Fun Posts on Language and Grammar

Monday, April 14, 2014

Ever wonder if the word you’re using literally means what you think it means? Does that beg the question? Do you even know what that turn of phrase means?

Here are some fun links to posts about our idiosyncratic English language (mainly American, but I’m sure some of these apply to others as well).

These 9 Words Don’t Mean What You Think They Mean

20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes

Crazy English

And remember, punctuation saves lives:

From @wrdinc on Instagram, found here

From @wrdinc on Instagram, found here

Fun Friday: Wait–what? There was a CAR in that ad?

Friday, April 11, 2014

Fun Friday 2013

I wonder if Jaguar realizes that their celebrity spokesperson far outshines their car(s) in this ad.
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Throwback Thursday: Who Would You Put on the Cover of a Romance Novel? #TBT

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Throwback Thursday

Sometimes, I’m late jumping on a bandwagon. But when I do, I jump on (in) with both feet and take up the banner. Here, instead of posting old photos, #TBT will be looking back at the 1,760 posts from the past eight years (yes, I’ve been blogging for EIGHT YEARS!) and sharing one chosen at random every Thursday.

If you want to join in the #TBT fun, share a link to your #TBT post in the comments section below!

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Throwback Thursday Post of the Week:
Who Would You Put on the Cover of a Romance Novel?

Originally posted: February 17, 2012

It’s no secret that modeling for the front cover of romance novels has made someone very famous. And then, there’s Fabio. ;-)

Did you know that Corbin Bernsen got his start modeling—and did some covers for Harlequin? Even though I’ve never been able to find an image, I met an author at a conference a couple of years ago whose first Harlequin featured Bernson as the hero on the front cover.

And then there’s this guy:

If you’re a fan of HGTV (or if you follow me on Pinterest), you recognize this guy: it’s John Gidding from Curb Appeal.

Yes, that’s right, John Gidding got his start as a model and did several romance novel covers (a few more of which you can see here, here, and here).

Of course, in this age of the proliferation of self-publishing—and of authors doing their own book covers, we might find that we see more and more self-designed covers like this:

Does that guy look familiar to you? Maybe because it’s a Photoshopped, flipped rendering of this actor’s headshot:

(How has this author gotten away with such a blatant use of a famous person’s image? Still trying to figure that out.)

Because they’re the key romantic leads in the series I’m working on right now, I’d love to have a “rendering” of these guys on my next three books:


Henry Cavill as Andrew Lawton (Follow the Heart); Chris Hemsworth as Dr. Neal Stradbroke (An Honest Heart);
Daniel Craig as Lord Stephen Brightwell, Viscount Thynne (The Heart That Waits)

So even though we’ve done this before (but it’s been a long time), I thought it would be fun to do it again.

Who would you like to see on the
front cover of a romance novel?

Get creative, get obsessional. And it doesn’t have to be just men, seeing as how images of women are so popular on the front covers of historicals in the Christian market. Be sure to post a link to an image if you can so we can see him/her, too!

AN HONEST HEART Giveaway!

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

An Honest Heart Giveaway!

On April 15, Goodreads will be drawing the names of five winners for a signed copy of An Honest Heart—that means you still have six days to sign up!

An Honest Heart

Click here to enter!

Drawing is open to residents of the US, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand.

ABOUT THE BOOK:
Dr. Neal Stradbroke has a secret past that could destroy everything he’s worked since childhood to build. But when he falls in love with the daughter of one of his patients, he must choose between revealing his past and risk losing everything or keeping his secret and watching her marry another man.

Cadence “Caddy” Bainbridge has worked hard as a seamstress since her vicar father died, and for a while, things went well. But then her mother fell ill. Now, most of Caddy’s earnings go for doctors, medicines, and trips to the seaside trying to get her mother better. The last thing she needs is a romantic entanglement—but she finds herself torn between two men: Oliver Carmichael, whose wealth could give Caddy’s mother the life of ease she deserves; and Neal Stradbroke, for whom her heart yearns.

Oliver Carmichael has always drawn the eye of all the girls with no exertion on his part—all the girls, that is, except seamstress Caddy Bainbridge. So, even though he has plans to marry Edith Buchanan, he places a bet with his friends that he can make Caddy fall in love with him before the opening day of the Great Exhibition. Edith Buchanan has been disappointed in marriage prospects already, so she is not about to lose another suitor to a woman of lower social status—especially not her own dressmaker!—so she spreads rumors about Caddy that could not only ruin Caddy’s business but cause Caddy’s mother to have a fatal relapse.

Courtship . . . cunning . . . candor. Who has an honest heart?

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